running,Sportsmedicine, gout,knee injuries, stress fracture, multiple fracture,ankle injuries,knee pain, srained ankle, ligament injury, ankle instability,meniscus tear,ligament injury,arthroscopy, athlete,female athele             

 
 

Life is movement, Movement is life

running,Sportsmedicine, gout,knee injuries, stress fracture, multiple fracture,ankle injuries,knee pain, srained ankle, ligament injury, ankle instability,meniscus tear,ligament injury,arthroscopy, athlete,female athele

   Running

Running

running,Sportsmedicine, gout,knee injuries, stress fracture, multiple fracture,ankle injuries,knee pain, srained ankle, ligament injury, ankle instability,meniscus tear,ligament injury,arthroscopy, athlete,female athele

Running is a sport of passion. Running injuries are an unfortunate, but all too common, occurrence. Understanding a running injury is the key to effective treatment.

Common running injuries

Hip & Thigh Injuries

  • Hip Bursitis
    Inflammation of the bursa over the outside of the hip joint, so-called trochanteric bursitis, can cause pain with hip movement. Treatment of hip bursitis is often effective, but the condition has a problem of coming back and sometimes becoming a persistent problem.

  • Snapping Hip Syndrome
    Snapping hip syndrome is a word used to describe three distinct hip problems. The first is when the IT band snaps over the outside of the thigh. The second occurs when the deep hip flexor snaps over the front of the hip joint. Finally, tears of the cartilage, or labrum, around the hip socket can cause a snapping sensation.

  • Iliotibial Band Syndrome
    The iliotibial band is a thick, fibrous band that spans from the hip to the shin; it lends stability to the knee joint, and is attached to muscles of the thigh. ITBS is caused when the band becomes inflamed and tender.

  • Pulled Hamstring
    A pulled hamstring is a common sports injury, seen most commonly in sprinters. A pulled hamstring is a injury to the muscle called a hamstring strain. Treatment of a pulled hamstring is important for a speedy recovery.

  • Hip Stress Fractures
    Stress fractures of the hip are most common in athletes who participate in high-impact sports, such as long distance runners. Treatment usually is successful by avoiding the impact activities.

Knee Injuries

  • Patellofemoral Syndrome
    Also called "Runner's Knee," problems associated with the patella, or kneecap, are common in runners. The term runner's knee may refer to several common injuries such as chondromalacia, patellar tendonitis, or generalized knee pain. .

  • Plica Syndrome
    Plica syndrome occurs when there is irritation of the lining of the knee joint. Part of the lining of the knee joint is more prominent in some individuals, and can form a so-called plica shelf. If this tissue becomes inflamed, it can cause knee pain.

Leg Injuries

  • Shin Splints
    Shin splints, like runner's knee, is a term that describes a set of symptoms, not an actual diagnosis. Shin splint pain can be due to problems with the muscles, bone, or the attachment of the muscle to the bone.

  • Stress Fractures
    Stress fractures of the hip are usually seen in long distance runners, and much more commonly in women than in men. These injuries are usually seen in endurance athletes with deficient nutrition or eating disorders.

  • Exercise Induced Compartment Syndrome
    Exercise induced compartment syndrome is a condition that causes pain over the front of the leg with activity. Patients with exercise induced compartment syndrome may require surgery, call a fasciotomy, to relieve their symptoms.

Ankle Injuries

  • Ankle Sprain
    Ankle sprains are common injuries that runners experience. Early recognition and treatment of this problem will help speed your recovery from ankle ligament injuries.

  • Achilles Tendonitis
    Achilles tendonitis is a painful condition of the tendon in the back of the ankle. Left untreated, Achilles tendonitis can lead to an increased risk of Achilles tendon rupture.

Foot Injuries

  • Plantar Fasciitis
    Plantar fasciitis is a syndrome of heel pain due to inflammation of the thick ligament of the base of the foot. A tight, inflamed plantar fascia can cause pain when walking or running, and lead to the formation of a heel spur.

  • Overpronation
    Pronation is a normal movement of the foot through the gait cycle. When this motion becomes excessive, overpronation can cause a variety by altering the normal mechanics of the gait cycle. Shoes to control excess foot motion can be helpful for overpronators.

  • Arch Pain
    Arch pain is a common foot complaint. Arch pain, also sometimes called a strain, often causes inflammation and a burning sensation under the arch of the foot. Treatment of arch pain often consists of adaptive footwear and inserts.

Avoiding Injuries

 Even with the most attentive preventative athlete, however, a running injury may still occur--such is the nature of the sport. Taking a few steps will decrease your chances of developing a serious problem:

 

 Stretching out before exercising is an important, and often neglected, step in your workout. A good routine should be established, and following the suggestions below will help you on your way.

Difficulty: Average

Time Required: 20 minutes

Here's How:

  1. Know your sport.
    Whether you're in the gym, on the track, or anywhere else, it's important to know what your workout will involve. Understanding which muscles will be worked is the only way to know how to best stretch out.

  2. Focus on those muscles.
    While a good overall routine is helpful, your emphasis should be on the muscles that will be most heavily involved in your workout.

  3. Warm up before stretching.
    Just some easy walking or a light jog will be sufficient to warm up your muscles, but it will make the stretching session much more valuable.

  4. Begin slowly.
    You don't need to touch your toes right away: Begin slowly and push yourself as your muscles loosen up. Stretching too much, too soon can be painful and potentially harmful.

  5. Hold the stretch.
    Once you feel your muscles reaching their limit, hold the position for a count of 10. Then push yourself a little further and hold again for a count of 10.

  6. Don't rush your stretching routine.
    If you're going to have to cut your workout short, don't skip or shorten the stretching. This is more important than an extra set of reps or another half mile.

  7. Do it again.
    Once you're finished working out, stretch again. Not only is it an excellent way to cool down from your workout, but this is the time that you will improve your flexibility the most.

Tips:

  1. Don't bounce!
    You will get the best stretch, and prevent injuries if you avoid bouncing. Instead, hold the stretch, and feel a constant pull in the muscles.

  2. Stretch both sides.
    Many people have a tendency to under-stretch the 'healthy' side after an injury. Use the same stretches, for the same amount of time, for both sides of your body.

  3. Get professional help.
    Gym trainers, physical therapists, exercise instructors will all know great ways to stretch. When you're getting started, have someone knowledgeable watch your routine and offer their suggestions.

 

 

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